Undergraduate Neurobiology Courses

Courses

Introductory
Foundational
Advanced Neuro
Tutorials
Electives
Grad 200 Level
MBB Track
MBB Junior Seminars
MBB Electives
Comp Neuro Track
Comp Neuro Track
Independent Research
NEURO 91 AND 99
Study Abroad Courses
Study Abroad Courses
Petition for Credit
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  • Introductory Courses

    USUALLY TAKEN SOPHOMORE YEAR

    Either of the following courses (MCB 80 and MCB 81) fulfills the required introductory neurobiology course requirement.

    Fall

    MCB 80: Neurobiology of Behavior

    An introduction to the ways in which the brain controls mental activities – Dr. Lichtman & Dr. Sanes, Q Report

    MCB 81: Fundamentals of Neuroscience

    An intensive introduction to topics in neuroscience – Dr. Cox, Q Report

    Fall

    MCB 80: Neurobiology of Behavior

    An introduction to the ways in which the brain controls mental activities – Dr. Lichtman & Dr. Sanes, Q Report

    MCB 81: Fundamentals of Neuroscience

    An intensive introduction to topics in neuroscience – Dr. Cox, Q Report

  • Foundation Courses

    USUALLY TAKEN SOPHOMORE OR JUNIOR YEAR

    Any one of the following courses fulfills the Neurobiology ‘Foundational’ course requirement. Additional courses from this category can be used to fulfill the ‘Advanced Neurobiology Elective’ courses requirement.

    Fall

    MCB 115: Cellular Basis of Neuronal Function

    Biophysical and cell biological approaches to excitability, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity – Dr. Murthy, Q Report

    Spring

    OEB 57: Animal Behavior

    A study of the diverse mental activities and nervous systems shaped by evolution – Dr. Pierce and Dr. Olveczky, Q Report

    [MCB 125:Molecular Basis of Behavior] not offered ’17-18

    How genes and molecules affect behaviors will be investigated through key examples of mammalian behaviors – Dr. Dulac, Q Report

    MCB 105: Systems Neuroscience

    A study of how neural circuitry underlies animal behavior and how neural activity shapes connections during learning and memory – Dr. Engert, Q Report

    Fall
    Spring

    MCB 115: Cellular Basis of Neuronal Function

    Biophysical and cell biological approaches to excitability, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity – Dr. Murthy, Q Report

    OEB 57: Animal Behavior

    A study of the diverse mental activities and nervous systems shaped by evolution – Dr. Pierce and Dr. Olveczky, Q Report

    [MCB 125:Molecular Basis of Behavior] not offered ’17-18

    How genes and molecules affect behaviors will be investigated through key examples of mammalian behaviors – Dr. Dulac, Q Report

    MCB 105: Systems Neuroscience

    A study of how neural circuitry underlies animal behavior and how neural activity shapes connections during learning and memory – Dr. Engert, Q Report

  • Tutorials

    YEAR LONG, USUALLY TAKEN JUNIOR YEAR

    All tutorials are half courses (4 credits) that meet throughout the year and cannot be divided with credit. Only one tutorial may count toward concentration requirements (as an advanced neurobiology course).

    These courses are recommended for juniors and capped at 12 students. They provide an opportunity to learn from a professional neurobiologist over an entire year, to explore important research topics that are not covered in depth in other courses, and to become comfortable reading primary scientific literature and analyzing scientific data.

    We are offering 5 tutorials this year. You can and should shop multiple tutorials. To enroll in a tutorial:

    • Step 1 (Recommended). Come to the Tutorial Fair to meet all the tutors and collect syllabi: August 29th 4:30-6 PM in Bauer Cafe.
    • Step 2. (Required) Enter your preferences online by Weds 9/6 10:00 PM :
      • >80% of students get their first choice. Enter 2-5 preferences to ensure you get a spot.
      • I will run the sectioning algorithm at 11 PM and email you with your approved class.
    • Step 3. Add the Fall component (A) of your approved tutorial (eg, Neuro 101BA) to your Crimson Cart. If you are approved for the class, you will be given permission to enroll.
    FALL/SPRING FULL YEAR
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    Neuro 101B: Beyond Neurons: The role of Glia (New Course) – Dr. Sarah Hopp

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    Neuro 101E (formerly Neuro 106): Human Cognition: Reading and Writing the Neural Code – Dr. Patel, Q Report

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    Neuro 101F (formerly Neuro 111): The Neurobiology of Learning and Memory – Dr. Joseph Zak

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    Neurobiology 101G: Sex and the Brain (New Course) – Dr. Tari Tan

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    Neurobiology 101H: Visual Circuits: How Neurons and Networks See (New Course) – Dr. Till Hartmann

    FALL/SPRING FULL YEAR
    Professor picture

    Neuro 101B: Beyond Neurons: The role of Glia (New Course) – Dr. Sarah Hopp

    Professor picture

    Neuro 101E (formerly Neuro 106): Human Cognition: Reading and Writing the Neural Code – Dr. Patel, Q Report

    Professor picture

    Neuro 101F (formerly Neuro 111): The Neurobiology of Learning and Memory – Dr. Joseph Zak

    Professor picture

    Neurobiology 101G: Sex and the Brain (New Course) – Dr. Tari Tan

    Professor picture

    Neurobiology 101H: Visual Circuits: How Neurons and Networks See (New Course) – Dr. Till Hartmann

  • Circuits and Systems

    In ‘Circuits and Systems’ courses, students study how information is processed in neural pathways and how information forms and modifies neurons and/or behavior. Studies may focus on development, sleep, sensation and perception, and/or motor control.

    FALL

    MCB 115: Cellular Basis of Neural Function – biophysical and cell biological approaches to excitability, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity – Dr. Murthy, Q Report

    [OEB 105: Neurobiology of Motor Control – organization, anatomy and mechanisms of movement – Dr. Olveczky, Q Report] – not offered 17-18

    BME 110 Physiological Systems Analysis
    – Dr. Merfeld, Q Report

    SPRING

    MCB 105: Systems Neuroscience – a study of how neural circuitry underlies animal behavior and how neural activity shapes connections during learning and memory – Dr. Engert, Q Report

    [MCB 125: Molecular Basis of Behavior] – How genes and molecules affect behaviors will be investigated through key examples of mammalian behaviors – Dr. Dulac, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

     MCB 146: Experience-based Brain Development  – this course integrates molecular & cell biology with systems neuroscience to explore mechanisms underlying critical periods in development – Dr. Hensch, Q Report

     MCB 145: Neurobiology of Perception and Decision Making – neural circuits underlying perception and behavior – Dr. Uchida, Q Report 

    MCB 148: The Neurobiology of Pain ] – This course will explore the neurobiological systems and mechanisms underlying both acute and chronic pain.- Dr. Draft  Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    MCB 186: Circadian Biology – Sleep and Circadian Clocks: from Biology to Public Health – Dr. Czeisler, Q Report

    FALL
    SPRING

    MCB 115: Cellular Basis of Neural Function – biophysical and cell biological approaches to excitability, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity – Dr. Murthy, Q Report

    MCB 105: Systems Neuroscience – a study of how neural circuitry underlies animal behavior and how neural activity shapes connections during learning and memory – Dr. Engert, Q Report

    [OEB 105: Neurobiology of Motor Control – organization, anatomy and mechanisms of movement – Dr. Olveczky, Q Report] – not offered 17-18

    [MCB 125: Molecular Basis of Behavior] – How genes and molecules affect behaviors will be investigated through key examples of mammalian behaviors – Dr. Dulac, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    BME 110 Physiological Systems Analysis
    – Dr. Merfeld, Q Report

     MCB 146: Experience-based Brain Development  – this course integrates molecular & cell biology with systems neuroscience to explore mechanisms underlying critical periods in development – Dr. Hensch, Q Report

     MCB 145: Neurobiology of Perception and Decision Making – neural circuits underlying perception and behavior – Dr. Uchida, Q Report 

    MCB 148: The Neurobiology of Pain ] – This course will explore the neurobiological systems and mechanisms underlying both acute and chronic pain.- Dr. Draft  Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    MCB 186: Circadian Biology – Sleep and Circadian Clocks: from Biology to Public Health – Dr. Czeisler, Q Report

  • Cognitive Science

    ‘Cognitive Science’ courses focus on studying the brain regions that underlie human behavior using EEG, fMRI, pharmacological, phenomenological, and/or disease studies.

    FALL

    Psychology 1201: Your Brain on Drugs: Psychopharmacology – Dr. Lukas, Q Report

    Psychology 1304: Brain Damage as a Window into the Mind: Cognitive Neuropsychology – Dr. Caramazza, Q Report

    [ Psychology 1401: Computational Cognitive Neuroscience ] – simulate brain function with computer programs. Emphasis  on  learning, memory, attention, decision-making, and object perception. – Dr. Gershman, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    Psychology 1456: Clever Brain  – Information Flow and Decision Making. – Dr. Xu, Q Report

    SPRING

    [ Psychology 1052 The application of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience research ]
    – Dr. Xu,Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    [ Psychology 1202 Modern Neuroanatomy
    – Dr. Buckner  – Q Report not offered ’17-18

    [Psychology 1251: Circuits and Symptoms- Dr. Buckholtz, Q Report]  – not offered ’17-18

    Psychology 1303: The Human Brain Then and Now
    – Dr. Buckner, Q Report

    [Psychology 1430: Human Memory and Amnesia – current data and theory concerning human memory and amnesia from cognitive, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological perspectives – Dr. Schacter, Q Report] – not offered ’17-18

    [ Psychology 1451: Debugging the brain: Computational Approaches to Mental Dysfunction ] – This course examines recent work applying computational models to mental disorders. – Dr. Gershman  Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    FALL
    SPRING

    Psychology 1201: Your Brain on Drugs: Psychopharmacology – Dr. Lukas, Q Report

    [ Psychology 1052 The application of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience research ]
    – Dr. Xu,Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    Psychology 1304: Brain Damage as a Window into the Mind: Cognitive Neuropsychology – Dr. Caramazza, Q Report

    [ Psychology 1202 Modern Neuroanatomy
    – Dr. Buckner  – Q Report not offered ’17-18

    [ Psychology 1401: Computational Cognitive Neuroscience ] – simulate brain function with computer programs. Emphasis  on  learning, memory, attention, decision-making, and object perception. – Dr. Gershman, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    [Psychology 1251: Circuits and Symptoms- Dr. Buckholtz, Q Report]  – not offered ’17-18

    Psychology 1456: Clever Brain  – Information Flow and Decision Making. – Dr. Xu, Q Report

    Psychology 1303: The Human Brain Then and Now
    – Dr. Buckner, Q Report

    [Psychology 1430: Human Memory and Amnesia – current data and theory concerning human memory and amnesia from cognitive, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological perspectives – Dr. Schacter, Q Report] – not offered ’17-18

    [ Psychology 1451: Debugging the brain: Computational Approaches to Mental Dysfunction ] – This course examines recent work applying computational models to mental disorders. – Dr. Gershman  Q Report – not offered ’17-18

  • Computational and Quantitative Neurobiology

    These courses use quantitative (mathematical, biophysical, and/or computational) approaches to understand the functions of neurons and neural circuits.

    FALL

    BME 110: Physiological Systems Analysis
    – Dr. Merfeld, Q Report

    MCB 115: Cellular Basis of Neural Function – biophysical and cell biological approaches to excitability, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity – Dr. Murthy, Q Report

    Neurobiology 130: Visual object Recognition – Computational Models and Neurophysiological Mechanisms – Dr. Kreiman, Q Report

    Physics 141: The Physics of Sensory Systems in Biology – Dr. Samuel, Q Report

    [ Psychology 1401: Computational Cognitive Neuroscience ] – teaching students how to simulate brain function with computer programs. Special emphasis will be placed on processes like learning, memory, attention, decision-making, and object perception. – Dr. Gershman, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    SPRING

    Biomedical Engineering 130: Neural Control of Movement – Dr. Smith, Q Report

    [ MCB 131: Computational Neuroscience ] – Dr. Sompolinsky, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    Neuro 120: Introductory Computational Neuroscience (New Course) – modeling what and how neurons compute and concrete analysis of real neurons in action  – Dr. Kenny Blum

    [ Psychology 1451: Debugging the brain: Computational Approaches to Mental Dysfunction ] – This course examines recent work applying computational models to mental disorders. – Dr. Gershman  Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    FALL
    SPRING

    BME 110: Physiological Systems Analysis
    – Dr. Merfeld, Q Report

    Biomedical Engineering 130: Neural Control of Movement – Dr. Smith, Q Report

    MCB 115: Cellular Basis of Neural Function – biophysical and cell biological approaches to excitability, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity – Dr. Murthy, Q Report

    [ MCB 131: Computational Neuroscience ] – Dr. Sompolinsky, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    Neurobiology 130: Visual object Recognition – Computational Models and Neurophysiological Mechanisms – Dr. Kreiman, Q Report

    Neuro 120: Introductory Computational Neuroscience (New Course) – modeling what and how neurons compute and concrete analysis of real neurons in action  – Dr. Kenny Blum

    Physics 141: The Physics of Sensory Systems in Biology – Dr. Samuel, Q Report

    [ Psychology 1451: Debugging the brain: Computational Approaches to Mental Dysfunction ] – This course examines recent work applying computational models to mental disorders. – Dr. Gershman  Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    [ Psychology 1401: Computational Cognitive Neuroscience ] – teaching students how to simulate brain function with computer programs. Special emphasis will be placed on processes like learning, memory, attention, decision-making, and object perception. – Dr. Gershman, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

  • Development, Plasticity and Aging

    These courses focus on the mechanisms that influence how the brain changes over the life of an organism (genetic, cellular, and environmental) . In courses on early development (embryonic), students study the influence and control of genes and molecules; courses on later ages focus on how changes in neural activity and molecular function influence cell populations and connection

    FALL

    MCB 129: The Brain: Development, Plasticity, and Decline. Learning how the neural circuitry of the brain develops, displays plasticity in maturity and declines in function with aging. – Dr. Kunes, Q Report

    [SCRB 160: Experimental Embryology: Stem Cells to Tissues – apply experimental and surgical approaches to illustrate critical events of embryonic development – Dr. Arlotta, Q Report]  – not offered ’17-18

    [ SCRB 182: Got Brain? Evolution’s Role in Generating and Regenerating the Brain ]- Dr. Arlotta, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    [SCRB 180: Repair and Regeneration in the Mammalian Brain – Dr. Macklis, Q Report]  – not offered ’17-18

    SPRING

    [ MCB 125: Molecular Basis of Behavior ] – How genes and molecules affect behaviors will be investigated through key examples of mammalian behaviors – Dr. Dulac, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    MCB 146: Experience-based Brain Development  – this course integrates molecular & cell biology with systems neuroscience to explore mechanisms underlying critical periods in development. – Dr. Hensch, Q Report

    FALL
    SPRING

    MCB 129: The Brain: Development, Plasticity, and Decline. Learning how the neural circuitry of the brain develops, displays plasticity in maturity and declines in function with aging. – Dr. Kunes, Q Report

    [ MCB 125: Molecular Basis of Behavior ] – How genes and molecules affect behaviors will be investigated through key examples of mammalian behaviors – Dr. Dulac, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    [SCRB 160: Experimental Embryology: Stem Cells to Tissues – apply experimental and surgical approaches to illustrate critical events of embryonic development – Dr. Arlotta, Q Report]  – not offered ’17-18

    MCB 146: Experience-based Brain Development  – this course integrates molecular & cell biology with systems neuroscience to explore mechanisms underlying critical periods in development. – Dr. Hensch, Q Report

    [ SCRB 182: Got Brain? Evolution’s Role in Generating and Regenerating the Brain ]- Dr. Arlotta, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    [SCRB 180: Repair and Regeneration in the Mammalian Brain – Dr. Macklis, Q Report]  – not offered ’17-18

  • Disease and Therapeutics

    ‘Disease and Therapeutics’ courses study disorders of the nervous system and how they are treated through pharmacological intervention or stem cell therapies.

    FALL

    [SCRB 180: Repair and Regeneration in the Mammalian Brain – Dr. Macklis, Q Report]  – not offered ’17-18

    [ SCRB 182: Got Brain? Evolution’s Role in Generating and Regenerating the Brain ] – Dr. Arlotta,Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    Psychology 1201: Your Brain on Drugs: Psychopharmacology – Dr. Lukas, Q Report

    SPRING

    MCB 170: Brain Invaders: Building and Breaking Barriers in the Nervous System – Dr. Magnotti, Q Report

    [ MCB 148: The Neurobiology of Pain  ] – This course will explore the neurobiological systems and mechanisms underlying both acute and chronic pain.- Dr. Draft, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    FALL
    SPRING

    [SCRB 180: Repair and Regeneration in the Mammalian Brain – Dr. Macklis, Q Report]  – not offered ’17-18

    MCB 170: Brain Invaders: Building and Breaking Barriers in the Nervous System – Dr. Magnotti, Q Report

    [ SCRB 182: Got Brain? Evolution’s Role in Generating and Regenerating the Brain ] – Dr. Arlotta,Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    [ MCB 148: The Neurobiology of Pain  ] – This course will explore the neurobiological systems and mechanisms underlying both acute and chronic pain.- Dr. Draft, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    Psychology 1201: Your Brain on Drugs: Psychopharmacology – Dr. Lukas, Q Report

  • Molecular Genetics of Neurobiology

    In these courses, students study how genes – and the molecules they encode – interact with the organism to influence its organization and behavior.

    FALL

    OEB 145: Genes and Behaviors – genetic influence and control of behaviors in both invertebrates and vertebrate animals – Dr. Zhang, Q Report

    SPRING
    FALL
    SPRING

    OEB 145: Genes and Behaviors – genetic influence and control of behaviors in both invertebrates and vertebrate animals – Dr. Zhang, Q Report

  • Laboratory and Research

    In ‘Laboratory and Research’ courses, students get hands on experience either conducting an open ended research project, learning techniques, and/or repeating classic experiments to uncover principles of neurobiology.

    FALL

    LS 100: Experimental Research in the Life Sciences: dynamic project-based research course

    Note: Students must must enroll in one of the Neurobiology projects – Dr. Viel, Q Report

    [ SCRB 182: Got Brain? Evolution’s Role in Generating and Regenerating the Brain ] – Dr. Arlotta, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    SPRING

    LS 100: Experimental Research in the Life Sciences: dynamic project-based research course

    Note: Students must must enroll in one of the Neurobiology projects – Dr. Viel, Q Report

    [ Psychology 1052: The application of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience research ] – Dr. Xu, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    FALL
    SPRING

    LS 100: Experimental Research in the Life Sciences: dynamic project-based research course

    Note: Students must must enroll in one of the Neurobiology projects – Dr. Viel, Q Report

    LS 100: Experimental Research in the Life Sciences: dynamic project-based research course

    Note: Students must must enroll in one of the Neurobiology projects – Dr. Viel, Q Report

    [ SCRB 182: Got Brain? Evolution’s Role in Generating and Regenerating the Brain ] – Dr. Arlotta, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

    [ Psychology 1052: The application of fMRI in cognitive neuroscience research ] – Dr. Xu, Q Report  – not offered ’17-18

  • Grad 200 Level

    † Courses taught at Harvard Medical School (HMS, Longwood Campus)

    FALL

    Neurobiology 215A†: Cellular Neurophysiology – Dr. Goodrich et al, Q Report

    SPRING

    BCMP 213: Behavioral Pharmacology – Drs. Bergman & Paronis, Q Report

    [Computer Science 280r: Advanced Topics in artificial Intelligence – Dr. Grosz, Q Report]– not offered 2017-18

    [Engineering Sciences 226r: Topics in neural engineering: Learning and memory – Dr. Smith, Q Report] – not offered 2017-18

    Neurobiology 209†: Neurobiology of Disease
    – Dr. Kravitz, Q Report

    This course covers a major disease or disorder of the nervous system each week, including Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s Diseases, Mood and Autism Spectrum disorder and others. The course is taught at the Harvard Medical School on Monday (6-8:30 PM) and Wednesday (7-9:30 PM) evenings. The Monday sessions involve patient presentations and “core” lectures describing clinical progression, pathology, and basic science underlying a major disease or disorder. On Wednesdays, students present material from original literature sources, and there is general discussion. The course is for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and MD and MD/PhD students. The recommended prerequisite are: Introductory neurobiology, biochemistry, and genetics/molecular biology. The course is given in alternate years and is listed at the Medical School as NB 713.0. The first meeting is on January 22 in Goldenson 122 at the Medical Quadrangle on Longwood Avenue (M2 shuttle bus from Quincy Street near Lamont Library—Harvard id gets you on the bus)

    SHBT 205†: Neural Coding and Perception of Sound  – Drs. Delgutte, Brown, Eddington, Guinan, Melcher, & Polley, Q Report

    FALL
    SPRING

    Neurobiology 215A†: Cellular Neurophysiology – Dr. Goodrich et al, Q Report

    BCMP 213: Behavioral Pharmacology – Drs. Bergman & Paronis, Q Report

    [Computer Science 280r: Advanced Topics in artificial Intelligence – Dr. Grosz, Q Report]– not offered 2017-18

    [Engineering Sciences 226r: Topics in neural engineering: Learning and memory – Dr. Smith, Q Report] – not offered 2017-18

    Neurobiology 209†: Neurobiology of Disease
    – Dr. Kravitz, Q Report

    This course covers a major disease or disorder of the nervous system each week, including Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s and Parkinson’s Diseases, Mood and Autism Spectrum disorder and others. The course is taught at the Harvard Medical School on Monday (6-8:30 PM) and Wednesday (7-9:30 PM) evenings. The Monday sessions involve patient presentations and “core” lectures describing clinical progression, pathology, and basic science underlying a major disease or disorder. On Wednesdays, students present material from original literature sources, and there is general discussion. The course is for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and MD and MD/PhD students. The recommended prerequisite are: Introductory neurobiology, biochemistry, and genetics/molecular biology. The course is given in alternate years and is listed at the Medical School as NB 713.0. The first meeting is on January 22 in Goldenson 122 at the Medical Quadrangle on Longwood Avenue (M2 shuttle bus from Quincy Street near Lamont Library—Harvard id gets you on the bus)

    SHBT 205†: Neural Coding and Perception of Sound  – Drs. Delgutte, Brown, Eddington, Guinan, Melcher, & Polley, Q Report

  • Study Abroad Courses

    There are many ways to study Neuro abroad. Please talk to Ryan or Laura to get started planning. We regularly have students study both during the term and in the summer all over the world.

    • For term time programs, visit the OIE.
    • For summer school programs, we give credit for the following:

    Trento, Italy (1 MBB course)

    Oxford, England (1 Intermediate Biology course)

    Tokyo or Yokohama, Japan (1 Advanced Neurobiology courses)

    Many students also create their own summer neurobiology program through grants from OCS (including non-credit internships, like the Weissman Fellowship). Check out more here! 

  • MBB Junior Seminars

    Note: all MBB 980 courses in the catalog count for the MBB seminar.

    FALL

    [ MBB 980A: Conscious States: Waking, Sleeping, and Dreaming ] – Dr. Stickgold, Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    [ MBB 980B: Addiction, Choice, & Motivation ] – Dr. Heyman, Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    MBB 980F: Creativity Research: Madmen, Geniuses, and Harvard Students – Dr. Carson, Q Report

    MBB 980L: Dopamine – Dr. Caine, Q Report

    MBB 980N: Neuroaesthetics  – Dr. Etcoff, Q Report

    MBB 980PMusic in Health and Education (New Course)  – Dr. Wong

    SPRING

    [ MBB 980G: The Origins and Evolution of Cognition – Drs. Pepperberg & Guzeldere], Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    MBB 980H: What Disease Teaches about Cognition -Drs. Milberg & Alexander, Q Report

    [ MBB 980K: Fghting Cancer with the Mind] – Dr.Jacobs, Q Report– not offered ’17-18

    MBB 980M: Functional Neuroimaging of Neuropsychiatric Disease – Dr. Silbersweig, Q Report

    MBB 980O: The Self: What Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience Tell Us, Dr. Nizzi, Q Report 

    MBB 980Q: Of Mice and Microbes: How Microbes shape Animal Behavior (New Course), Dr. Baker

    MBB 980OR: Pyschopaths and Psychopathy: Psychological, Neuroscientific, Legal, and Policy Issues (New Course), Dr. Fersch

    MBB 980S: Cognitive Neuroscience of Meditation (New Course), Dr. Lazar

    MBB 980T: Sleep and Mental Health (New Course), Dr. Pace-Schott

    FALL
    SPRING

    [ MBB 980A: Conscious States: Waking, Sleeping, and Dreaming ] – Dr. Stickgold, Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    [ MBB 980G: The Origins and Evolution of Cognition – Drs. Pepperberg & Guzeldere], Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    [ MBB 980B: Addiction, Choice, & Motivation ] – Dr. Heyman, Q Report – not offered ’17-18

    MBB 980H: What Disease Teaches about Cognition -Drs. Milberg & Alexander, Q Report

    MBB 980F: Creativity Research: Madmen, Geniuses, and Harvard Students – Dr. Carson, Q Report

    [ MBB 980K: Fghting Cancer with the Mind] – Dr.Jacobs, Q Report– not offered ’17-18

    MBB 980L: Dopamine – Dr. Caine, Q Report

    MBB 980M: Functional Neuroimaging of Neuropsychiatric Disease – Dr. Silbersweig, Q Report

    MBB 980N: Neuroaesthetics  – Dr. Etcoff, Q Report

    MBB 980O: The Self: What Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience Tell Us, Dr. Nizzi, Q Report 

    MBB 980PMusic in Health and Education (New Course)  – Dr. Wong

    MBB 980Q: Of Mice and Microbes: How Microbes shape Animal Behavior (New Course), Dr. Baker

    MBB 980OR: Pyschopaths and Psychopathy: Psychological, Neuroscientific, Legal, and Policy Issues (New Course), Dr. Fersch

    MBB 980S: Cognitive Neuroscience of Meditation (New Course), Dr. Lazar

    MBB 980T: Sleep and Mental Health (New Course), Dr. Pace-Schott

  • Comp Neuro Track

    The following list of classes count as modeling/analysis electives for students on the Computational Neuroscience Track. Additional courses may be petitioned for approval.

    Stat 108: Computing Software
    Stat 111: Theoretical Inference
    Stat 121: Data Science
    Stat 131: Time Series
    Stat 139: Linear Models
    Stat 171: Stochastic Processes
    Stat 220: Bayesian Data Analysis
    Stat 149: Generalized Linear Models

    ENG-SCI 115/APM: Mathematical Modeling
    ENG-SCI/APM 121: Intro to Optimization
    ENG-SCI 155: Biological Signal Processing
    ENG-SCI/APM 158: Feedback Control of Dynamical Systems

    MCB 111: Mathematics in Biology
    MCB 112: Biological Data Analysis
    MCB 198: Advanced Math Techniques for Modern Biology

    APM 50: Intro to Applied Mathematics
    APM 104: Series Expansions and Complex Analysis
    APM 105: Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations
    APM 107: Graph Theory and Combinatorics
    APM 108: Nonlinear Dynamical Systems
    APM 111: Intro Scientific Computing
    APM 120: Applied Linear Algebra and Big Data
    APM 231: Decision Theory

     

    CS 108: Intelligent Systems: Design and Ethical Challenges
    CS 109: Intro to Data Science
    CS 121: Intro to Theory of Computation
    CS 124: Data Structures and Algorithms
    CS 125: Algorithms and Complexity
    CS 143: Computer Networks
    CS 181: Machine Learning
    CS 182: Artificial Intelligence

  • Neuro 91 and 99

    Neurobiology 91. Laboratory Research
    Ryan W. Draft and Members of the Department

    This course is taken twice to obtain credit for independent laboratory research during the 6th, 7th, or 8th semester. Research work should be directed by a member of the Neurobiology concentration standing committee or an appropriate Harvard affiliated faculty member in another department or institution. All students must submit registration materials for Neurobiology 91 at the time of enrollment.

    Neuro 91 Registration Form – To be completed by registration deadline to enroll in Neuro 91.

    Neurobiology 99. Honors Thesis Tutorial
    Ryan W. Draft and Members of the Department

    For students writing a thesis in Neurobiology. This course is ordinarily taken in the last semester of enrollment. The Head Tutor must approve a thesis proposal prior to enrolling in Neurobiology 99.

    Neuro 99 Registration and Senior Abstract Form (serves as either form)  – To be completed by the registration deadline to enroll in Neuro 99 and/or submit your senior thesis abstract at the beginning of your 8th (final) semester. 

    Final written report instructions/forms for 91 students and thesis writers (see accordion below):
    ** Email the report to 1) your PI and 2) James Poolner (jp@mcb.harvard.edu) by the listed deadline **

    Potential Thesis Writer Enrolled in 91 or 99

    Non-Thesis Writer Enrolled in 91 or 99

    JUNIOR SPRING (6th semester)

    Neuro 91 Final Report
    Due: Wed, May 2, 5 PM

    SENIOR YEAR (7th and 8th semester)

    See Thesis Guidelines
    Fall: Rough Draft. Weds, Dec 6, 5 PM

    Spring: Final Thesis. Fri, March 9, 5 PM

    Neuro 91 Final Report

    Fall: Weds, Dec 6, 5 PM

    Spring: Weds, May 2, 5 PM

    JUNIOR SPRING (6th semester)
    SENIOR YEAR (7th and 8th semester)

    Potential Thesis Writer Enrolled in 91 or 99

    See Thesis Guidelines
    Fall: Rough Draft. Weds, Dec 6, 5 PM

    Spring: Final Thesis. Fri, March 9, 5 PM

    Non-Thesis Writer Enrolled in 91 or 99

    Neuro 91 Final Report
    Due: Wed, May 2, 5 PM

    Neuro 91 Final Report

    Fall: Weds, Dec 6, 5 PM

    Spring: Weds, May 2, 5 PM